Community e-Portfolio Questions

Community e-Portfolio Questions

    In your e-Portfolio, answer the following questions:

    In your mobilization e-Portfolio, answer these questions that are attributed to the 'Who is my Community?' section in your form:

    • What are some of the communities you are a part of? What do those communities share that helps to define them?
    • What communities are you ‘on the border of,’ as Olivia talks about? Are there communities that you think of yourself as a ally of?
    • Which communities might you want to work with to do a mobilization? Why that community

    In your mobilization e-Portfolio, answer these questions that are attributed to the 'Identities and Allyships' section on your form.

    • What are your identity markers? You can create a list and expand as you see fit.
    • Going back to thinking about your communities and the communities you are ‘on the border’ of. How do these identity markers affect your relationships with these communities in the context of solidarity work? Is there a power structure?
    • What are the important aspects that you should be aware of in order to ensure that you are working with the community and not imposing your ideas and projects?

    In your mobilization e-Portfolio, answer these questions that are attributed to the 'Intercommunity Dialogue' section on your form.

    • What is the role of gender in your community? What other values and factors are present in your community that you feel are oppressive to certain groups in society?
    • What is a value that you aim to change with your initiative? How do you think this value came about?
    • What role does it play in the community and why is it still upheld?
    • What are its connections to tradition and the culture, and how can you challenge it without posing a risk of changing the community’s identity?

    In your mobilization e-Portfolio, answer these questions that are attributed to the 'Communal Support' section on your form.

    • Going back to thinking about your own initiative, what personal link do you have with the work you are aiming to accomplish? What kind of experiences and knowledge do you have that you think are relevant to your work?
    • Can you give an example from your community and daily life where a problem could have been solved by communal efforts rather than individual work?

    In your mobilization e-Portfolio, answer these questions that are attributed to the 'How do Organizations Relate to Communities?' section on your form.

    • Why do you think it is important to have a relationship between an organization and the community it is working with? What are the benefits to having this relationship?
    • With your own initiative and project, how would you establish and maintain this link and relationship to the community beyond that of your working group?
    • Who would be the main community actors you would reach out to?
    • How would you ensure that your initiative is on the same terms and understanding as that of the community it is part of?

    In your mobilization e-Portfolio, answer these questions that are attributed to the 'Challenges Working in a Community' section on your form.

    • What aspect of your initiative might not receive community support? Why is that?
    • Should you work on altering your initiative or is this done purposefully to tackle something that needs change in the community?
    • Lina highlighted four dimensions of Dalia’s work: local economy, working with the environment, social relationships, and preserving culture. How do these four dimensions matter in your communities? What would you need and what do you already have if you wanted to work on these dimensions? How does this planning help you think about challenges to working in your community?

    In your mobilization e-Portfolio, answer these questions that are attributed to the 'Shared Problems' section on your form.

    • What are problems that you face that you would think are individual problems?
    • Do you think your neighbours face the same issues? What about your community?
    • What do you think prevents people from coming together and talking about their problems? Is it taboo? Social constraints?

    In your mobilization e-Portfolio, answer these questions that are attributed to the 'Community-Based Solutions' section on your form.

    • After having begun to think of a problem that you want to approach in your community, and after positioning yourself with respect to the community, can you think of ways to ensure the community’s role in designing the solutions?
    • How would you communicate with your community?
    • Who would you involve? And how?

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